David Green

David Green

  • Biography

    Grainger Gallery Presents
    "a family affair and other scratchings"
    David Green 14th July 2022

    It is a very rare occurrence that I begin a new work or body of works without establishing a list of working titles: doing so clarifies the direction, intent and the relationship that
    potentially exists between new works and their predecessors.
    In this present showing, between the Dickens “Great Expectations” suite and snippets
    from the lives of “the family”; the Dickens works are premised on the notion of “what
    if”; what if Dickens hadn’t written two endings , what if young Pip never met Magwitch
    or that after transportation to Australia he never returned to England.
    Musing on these possibilities led to compositions that sought to establish the two
    opposing dualities of what was known and what might have been. There is no one image
    for young Pip, Joe, Magwitch or Estella and for many our image of Miss Havisham is
    formed by the 1947 film classic directed by David Lean. Consequently my intention was
    not to include any formal figurative representation of the characters but design an alternative lifestyle that may have eventuated should different actions have eventuated.
    “Magwitch-what might have been”, for example, explores the journey from prisoner of
    the rotting hulks to wealthy Australian with all of the opportunities that wealth may have
    brought - landowner, member of parliament the possibilities are endless.
    Unlike the characters in the Dickens suite those portrayed in the “Family Affair” works
    have their true identity concealed, they only agree to allow glimpses of their real self,
    their hopes and desires. The relationship that exists between the viewer and these actors is a complex existence, it cannot be compared with the single hard edged frame of
    a jigsaw puzzle or as the viewing of an old photograph.
    This is a population of characters that we all have met, they are family, we know them
    they come together for celebrations of births and death, they send birthday and Christmas cards, argue, carry feuds over long forgotten incidents, laugh and shed tears. They
    infuriate, are compassionate and sometimes generous to a fault, they are funny and
    aggravating, have histories which occasionally they will reveal, they are the “Family.”
    We are the son, the daughter, the uncle, the aunt, the grandparent, the great grandparent,
    the teacher, the mentor, the confidant, hidden lives that take substance from the gaze of
    others.
    Family, knowing them is like trying to catch a moonbeam.
    I really just like making pictures.


    *******

    Emeritus Professor David Green is a fulltime artist living on the Sunshine Coast. Before retiring from his academic career he was Head of the Wagga Wagga Campus of Charles Sturt University and a former Chair of the Crafts Board of the Australia Council. He is author of four books, has had more than 10 solo exhibitions and participated in more than 50 selected and curated exhibitions.

    Green has been a selected finalist in numerous National and International art awards and his work is held in many Public Collections including the Sienna Institute of Art Italy, Brooklyn Art Library NY, Power House Museum Sydney, Queen Victoria Museum and Art Gallery Tas., Victorian State Craft Collection, Ararat City Art Gallery Vic., Tamworth National Fibre Collection NSW., Albury City Art Gallery, Wagga Wagga City Art Gallery, Ballarat University Collection, and Charles Sturt University Collection to name a few.

    All of these works are created with an old-fashioned dip pen and Indian ink on paper. Any additional colour is usually watercolour.

    I grew up in Dickens country, that part of Kent that when I was a child was rural, when summers were long and railways ran with smoky coal engines puffing clouds of steam and hot smoke that had a particular and special smell that lingered long after the train had passed. A time when mum’s holiday was spent hop picking , up at five or so to ride in an open lorry to the hop fields, the tally man would twice a day call out the number of bushels picked as the hops where placed in a big yellow “poke” sacks to be carried away by huge Clydesdale horses to the oast house. It now sounds so romantic and bucolic but the truth is it was hard and tedious work, mum loved the cameraderie, the banter and the rivalry and no doubt the money earned , for mum it was the the highlight of her year. I would far have preferred being down on the mud flats with the rotting barges, the mud islands, catching green crabs or “tickling” for fish.

    As a student in Rochester, (Kent) I drew many of the historical building , the Cathedral, with its Norman architectural beginnings, the Keep of the Norman castle built to guard the river crossing and Restoration house;( “Satis House”the home of Miss Havisham In Charles Dickens Great Expectations).

    Dickens wrote two endings to the novel (I must say I prefer the original ending over the seemingly second happy ending where Pip and Estella wander off together) Given that Dickens had two endings; In these works I explore the vagaries of what might have been it If certain characters acted differently or some actions never took place.

Showing all 11 artworks

David Green

Satis house -lies and deception
110 x 140 cm Indian ink (dip pen) on fabriano 300 gsm watercolour paper $20,000.00

David Green

Abel Magwitch -things that might have been
110 x 140 cm Indian ink (dip pen) on fabriano 300 gsm watercolour paper $20,000.00

David Green

Young Pip - home comforts
110 x 140 cm Indian ink (dip pen) on fabriano 300 gsm watercolour paper $20,000.00

David Green

Jaggers and Wemmick -solicitor and clerk
110 x 140 cm Indian ink (dip pen) on fabriano 300 gsm watercolour paper $20,000.00

David Green

Who am I
70 x 50 cm Indian ink (dip pen) and watercolour on Snowden 300GSM $6,000.00

David Green

Leaves that depart sadly
70 x 50 cm Indian ink (dip pen) and watercolour on Snowden 300GSM $6,000.00

David Green

Desk warrior wearing fake medals
70 x 50 cm Indian ink (dip pen) and watercolour on Snowden 300GSM $6,000.00

David Green

Great Aunts all seem to wear exotic hats and carry alligator handbags
70 x 50 cm Indian ink (dip pen) and watercolour on Snowden 300GSM Sold

David Green

Getting the kids ready for school takes 10 arms and 100 eyes
100 x 70 cm Indian ink (dip pen) and watercolour on Snowden 300GSM $12,500.00

David Green

It rained so we had a picnic under the table and pretended that Mum’s yellow dress was a bank of primroses
120 x 120 cm Indian ink (dip pen), watercolour and gold foil on fabriano 300gsm watercolour paper $14,500.00

David Green

For Their 30th Wedding Anniversary He Bought Her a Whole Pearl Perch
100 x 70 cm Indian Ink Dip Pen) and Watercolour on Snowden 300 gsm Sold